Bay Stormwater

Polluted stormwater runoff is a leading impediment to meeting water quality standards in the Bay. Urban stormwater has the dubious distinction of being the fastest growing nutrient source in the Chesapeake Bay, and is also a major source of sediment, pesticides and trace metals to the Bay. Although the stormwater problem has been recognized for two decades, federal, state and local land development regulations have had little impact on the problem – runoff pollution continues unabated in most parts of the Bay.

Baywide Stormwater Policy

The Chesapeake Bay Program is a regional partnership that was founded in 1983 to deal with the protection and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. Comprised of federal and state agencies, local governments, nonprofit organization and academic institutions, the Bay Program is organized into committees, goal implementation teams (GITS), workgroups and action teams. In 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) or “pollution diet” for the Chesapeake Bay. The TMDL requires significant reductions in Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Sediment across the Bay watershed by 2025.
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Fact Sheets

Check out our BMP Fact Sheets! Our newest recipes include how to earn credit for street cleaning programs and enhancements to IDDE programs.
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Urban Stormwater Workgroup

Visit our webpage to learn the latest updates of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Urban Stormwater Workgroup!
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BMP Inspection and Maintenance

The Urban Stormwater Workgroup’s recommended guidance for verifying the performance of urban BMPs in the Bay watershed.
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State Stormwater Policy

All of the Bay states are in the process of adapting more stringent stormwater regulations for both new development and redevelopment projects. In addition, each Bay state is implementing a watershed implementation plan to reduce pollutants from existing urban areas. Each of the seven jurisdictions in the Bay watershed has a stormwater management program, usually administered by their regulatory department.
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Local Stormwater Policy

In 1987 the Clean Water Act was amended to include stormwater discharges in the NPDES program. In 1990 Phase I of the program was implemented, requiring permits for stormwater discharges from all Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s) in communities of 100,000 people or greater as well as construction sites disturbing 5 acres of land or more. In 1999, Phase II of the program went into effect requiring permits for MS4s of 50,000 people or greater or with a density of 1000 people per square mile, and construction sites disturbing 1 or more acres of land. More than 500 communities in the Bay watershed are now regulated under these permits.
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MS4 Portal

Welcome to the newly created Ms4 Portal! A location for all of your MS4 permit and Bay TMDL needs. The MS4 portal was created as a way to share newly developed tools and resources with MS4s in the Bay watershed (and their consultants) working to meet MS4 permit requirements and the objectives of the Bay TMDL. We are...Learn more...

Baywide Stormwater Retreat

The retreat brings together almost 100 federal, state, local and NGO leaders from across the Chesapeake Bay watershed to share stormwater information, network together and discuss collaborative implementation strategies…
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