2015 Best Stream Restoration

Any project in the stream corridor (including zero order streams) that is explicitly designed to enhance the function, stability, and ecosystem services of an urban stream.

Example projects include: legacy sediment removal, floodplain reconnection, and natural channel design. Stream restoration projects will be evaluated on their ability to meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • The project was part of an integrated watershed-based approach.
  • The project meets or exceeds clearly stated goals and objectives that were based on an assessment of critical stream functions.
  • The project has successfully withstood significant flood events without damage.
  • The project utilizes innovative stream restoration techniques including but not limited to floodplain reconnection, legacy sediment removal, and natural channel design.
  • The project maximizes biological uplift within the stream reach.
  • The project minimizes the intrusion or damage to the stream corridor or floodplain
  • The project improvement is substantiated by post-construction monitoring and/or assessment

Below you will find information about the winners of the Best Stream Restoration category of the 2015 BUBBAs.

To learn more about our winners, check out the project files on our Google Drive account here.

To learn about the projects that won last year’s contest click here

Unfortunately, our winning project, Daylighting of Broad Branch and Restoration of its Linnean Park Tributary, was not captured in a video interview so instead we offer you this National Geographic feature of the site as a part of a series on stream daylighting. Enjoy!

First Place

Daylighting of Broad Branch and Restoration of its Linnean Park Tributary

Daylighting of Broad Branch and Restoration of its Linnean Park Tributary: a sampler shown during storm flow

Daylighting of Broad Branch and Restoration of its Linnean Park Tributary: a sampler shown during storm flow

Project Team:
The District Department of the Environment
Underwood and Associates
Biohabitats
Stantec

Daylighting of Broad Branch and Restoration of its Linnean Park Tributary

A short presentation describing the first place winner of the Best Stream Restoration category for the 2015 BUBBA contest.

Size (1 MB) | File type (.pdf) | Download

The restoration of the Linnean Park tributary and the daylighting and restoration of Broad Branch are two linked projects located in Northwest, Washington DC. The goal of this effort was to restore in-stream habitat and improve the urban hydrology of these two tributaries that flow to Rock Creek through a combination of bioretention, regenerative stream channel (RSC) design, and stream daylighting. The judges felt this was truly the Best Stream Restoration BMP in the Chesapeake Bay because it incorporated the following features: the recreation of a stream channel through the daylighting of a storm drainage system, integration with upstream BMPs to control runoff, commitment to post restoration monitoring through a paired monitoring design and finally it overcame the difficulty of working in an ultra-urban setting.

For more on the project click visit the folder on our google drive here.


 Second Place

Poplar Point Stream Restoration

After restoration: Cardinal flowers along the restored stream

After restoration: Cardinal flowers along the restored stream

Project Team:
South River Federation
Brightwater, Inc.

Where a 20 foot deep eroding gully lay until 2014, a beautiful restored coastal plain stream with a highly connected floodplain now exists. The Poplar Point Stream Restoration Project provides a unique blend of aquatic and upland wildlife habitat, while providing effective stormwater storage and processing. This project was scored the second highest because of the systematic approach to restoration that included several major projects that had been installed in the watershed since 2011. The Poplar Point Stream Restoration project had been identified in a watershed assessment to be the greatest contributor of sediment and nutrients in the South River watershed. This project also had concise measurable objectives (75% reduction in fine sediment transport, increase amphibian populations by 200%) and a long-term monitoring plan.

For more on the project click visit the folder on our google drive here.


 Third Place

Mechumps Creek Restoration Project

Mechumps Creek post restoration and insect monitoring.

Mechumps Creek post restoration and insect monitoring.

Project Team:
Charles Gowan, Randolph-Macon College
Ingrid Stenbjorn, Town of Ashland
Josh Running and Doug Beisch, Stantec
Chris Choppin, Environmental Quality Resources

Students and faculty at Randolph-Macon spearheading planning and fundraising to complete a stream restoration project along about 1,200 feet of Mechumps Creek in Ashland, VA. This project received third place because the judges felt the involvement of students from Randolf-Macon College made this project innovative with educational value that will involve students in continued monitoring and evaluation over the long-term with over 4 years of pre and post restoration monitoring.

For more on the project click visit the folder on our google drive here.


Honorable Mention

Meadow Creek Stream Restoration

Meadow Creek post restoration in winter

Meadow Creek post restoration in winter

Project Team:
City of Charlottesville, Virginia
The Nature Conservancy in Virginia

The Meadow Creek stream restoration project was a collaborative effort between The Nature Conservancy and the City of Charlottesville, Virginia to conduct restoration along a 9,000 linear foot section of highly degraded urban stream channel. The project used natural channel design approaches to establish a stable meandering stream pattern, reduce stream bank erosion and sedimentation, reconnect the stream to its floodplain, provide habitat for aquatic organisms, and protect and enhance the streamside forest. Over 70 acres of riparian forest buffers and wetlands were permanently protected by conservation easements, and more than 40 acres were added to the City’s public park system as a result of the restoration. The judges felt this project should receive honorable mention because of the enhancement to the park system, enhancements to the floodplain that would better ensure surface-groundwater interaction and synergy between this project and improvements to address CSOs in the area.

To learn more about our winners, check out the project files on our Google Drive account here.

Don’t forget to vote for you favorite BUBBA here!

Thank you to all our contestants who participate in the 2015 Best Urban BMP in the Bay Award !


We’d like to extend our deepest gratitude to all of the sponsors of the 2015 BUBBAs.
This year’s contest would not have been a possibility without you!

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