2017 Best Stream Restoration

This category is for any project in the stream corridor (including zero order streams) that is explicitly designed to enhance the function, stability, and ecosystem services of an urban stream.

Stream restoration projects will be evaluated on their ability to meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • The project was part of an integrated watershed-based approach.
  • The project meets or exceeds clearly stated goals and objectives that were based on an assessment of critical stream functions.
  • The project has successfully withstood significant flood events without damage.
  • The project utilizes innovative stream restoration techniques including but not limited to floodplain reconnection, legacy sediment removal, and natural channel design.
  • The project maximizes biological uplift within the stream reach.
  • The project minimizes the intrusion or damage to the stream corridor or floodplain
  • The project improvement is substantiated by post-construction monitoring and/or assessment

Below you will find information about the winners of the Best Stream Restoration category of the 2017 BUBBAs.

To learn more about this year’s winners, check out the project files on our Google Drive here.

First Place

North Cypress Branch Stream and Wetland Restoration

Diverse Plant Community at North Cypress Branch

Diverse Plant Community at North Cypress Branch

Project Team:

Anne Arundel County

Clear Creeks Consulting

BayLand Consultants and Designers

Underwood and Associates

Angler Environmental

This project used an integrated watershed restoration approach, creating or enhancing 7.4 acres of non-tidal wetland through the approximately 3,000 linear feet of stream restoration in a highly urbanized watershed. The project used a variety of techniques, including the creation of headwater wetlands, floodplain reconnection, creation of seepage wetlands in low order tributaries, and natural channel design to improve water quality treatment and enhance habitat function. Water quality benefits were measured through extensive post-construction monitoring.

To read a complete project narrative and view more photos, please visit the project folder in our Google Drive.

Second Place

Annapolis Harbour Center Stream and Wetland Restoration

Annapolis Harbour Center Post-Restoration

Annapolis Harbour Center Post-Restoration

Project Team:

South River Federation

Environmental Systems Analysis

Meadville Land Service

Lerner Enterprises

This stream and wetland restoration project restored a 1,500-foot reach while also providing greatly improved aquatic and upland habitat function. The project involved the re-connection of the stream to its floodplain as well as the planting of thousands of native plants throughout the site with the help of student and community volunteers. The comprehensive design created multiple wetland and stream habitat zones while treating stormwater runoff from a 34.5 acre area with 70% impervious cover.

To read a complete project narrative and view more photos, please visit the project folder in our Google Drive.

Third Place

Nash Run Stream Restoration and Trash Trap

Nash Run Trash Trap

Nash Run Trash Trap

Project Team:

District Department of Energy and the Environment

Johnson, Mirmiran, & Thompson

Environmental Quality Resources, L.L.C.

This project was a 1,400 foot stream restoration project that was combined with the installation of a trash trap. The project required substantial legacy sediment removal in order to ensure a low floodplain bench would exist in the stream corridor to reduce bank erosion. The resulting stream reach provided improved water quality treatment, reduced trash inputs to the Anacostia River, and reduced the risk of flooding to surrounding homes.

To read a complete project narrative and view more photos, please visit the project folder in our Google Drive.

Honorable Mention

Edith J. Carrier Arboretum Stream Restoration

Volunteer Planting for Arboretum Stream Restoration

Volunteer Planting for Arboretum Stream Restoration

Project Team:

William Kipling Mumaw – Ecosystem Services, LLC

This project restored 1,080 feet of a headwater tributary on the James Madison University Campus. The project design used an innovative approach to restoration, creating a stream-wetland complex complimented by considerable riparian and wetland plantings of native species chosen for their ability to create habitat, provide a food source, provide educational opportunities, and harmoniously exist in the setting. To limit the project footprint, the project design minimized grading, reduced tree removal, made use of onsite materials.

To read a complete project narrative and view more photos, please visit the project folder in our Google Drive.